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10TH BIENNIAL ONTARIO OPEN ART EXHIBITION OPEN CALL

Thursday, April 11, 2019 to Sunday, June 9, 2019

The Ontario Museum of History & Art, Associates is hosting the 10th Biennial Ontario Open Art Exhibit (“Ontario Open”) from April 11, 2019 to June 9, 2019.  This juried exhibition is one of the museum’s signature exhibitions that takes place every other year and is eagerly anticipated by area artists and the art community.

The Ontario Open is a wonderful opportunity for artists of all ages to show their work to the community.  Two-dimensional and three-dimensional artwork in any stable media will be accepted, but video, digital projection, audio or other installations requiring an electrical outlet will not be accepted.  All artwork must be the creation by the artist and created between 2017 and 2019.  Awards to be given out are: 1st place winner will receive $500, 2nd place winner will receive $300, 3rd place winner will receive $200 and four Honorable Mentions will receive $75 each.  Winners from the 2019 10th Biennial Ontario Open will be invited back to show in the 2020 10th Biennial Ontario Invitational Art Exhibit.  The museum will have an Awards Presentation and Opening Reception on Saturday, April 13, 2019 from 1 PM to 3 PM, remarks will begin at 1:30 PM.  

Artists interested in participating in this Open Call can pick up the 10th Biennial Ontario Open Art Exhibit prospectus form at the museum or download it below.  Drop off for the artwork will be Friday, March 22, 2019 from 1:00 PM to 3:30 PM and Saturday, March 23, 2019 from 9 AM to 3 PM.  An entry form needs to be filled out prior to arriving.  There is a non-refundable entry fee; Museum Members pay $25 for one entry piece or $40 for two entry pieces, and non-members pay $35 for one entry piece or $60 for 2 entry pieces.  All proceeds go to the Museum Associates to assist in funding community programs and exhibits offered by the Ontario Museum of History & Art.

 

Jerry Weems: Visual Histories

Thursday, January 31, 2019 to Sunday, March 17, 2019

Jerry Weems is a visual storyteller, highlighting the stories of people and places that had a significant impact on African American life today.  Jerry Weems: Visual Histories, on display from Thursday, January 31, 2019 thru Sunday, March 17, 2019, is a reflection of Weems childhood memories.  Growing up in the Deep South during the 1960s was a time of change for African Americans.  The Civil Rights Movement was in full swing and the Jim Crow laws had a strangled hole on the progress of blacks.  For hundreds of years, African Americans have orally passed down stories so that future generations could know their history.

As an artist Weems feels that it is incumbent upon himself to tell the story of the African American experience.  He seeks to glorify their existence, presenting them as strong, proud and empowered while also illuminating their plight and showing their pain; their joy together.  By doing this, he is telling the story of the many unsung heroes who gave their lives because they refused to submit to the whims of the oppressor. Free Admission.  For more information, call (909) 395-2510.

Photo Credit.  Hog Killing Time by Jerry Weems.

Danny Lyon: Memories of Southern Civil Rights

Thursday, January 31, 2019 to Sunday, March 17, 2019

Based upon Danny Lyon’s memoir, this exhibit brings together the photographs he took from 1962 to 1964 while traveling through the United States documenting the Civil Rights Movement. Lyon began his photographic career as the first staff photographer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), a national group of college students who joined together in 1960 after the first sit-in by four African American college students at a North Carolina lunch counter. Organized by art2art Circulating Exhibitions.

© Danny Lyon, New York & Magnum Photos, New York / Courtesy Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York.

Danny Lyon

 

Black and White in Black and White: Images of Dignity, Hope, and Diversity in America

Thursday, January 31, 2019 to Sunday, March 10, 2019

Enter the optimistic era of “The New Negro Movement” through the photographs of African American photographer John Johnson. His ennobling portraits, taken from 1910-1925, reveal the dignity and hope of his friends and neighbors during this time of great promise for African Americans. Organized by Exhibit Envoy.

Backyard Picnic, c. 1910-1925. Photograph by John Johnson, from the Douglas Keister Collection.

Black and White

Gem of the Foothills

Permanent Exhibit

This exhibit explores the unique history of Ontario—it’s founding, transitions, people and organizations.

Explore Ontario from its roots beginning with the Native Peoples and Californio Rancheros to its founding by George Chaffey. Discover why it has been called both a “Model Colony” and the “Gem of the Foothills.”

The book, Ontario The Gem of the Foothills by Michael L. Rounds, traces Ontario history from the Native American era to the present day. Many historic images from the museum’s collections are published here for the first time.

This interpretive history about our community is for sale in the museum store.

Road Ways

Permanent Exhibit

This is an interpretive, humanities-based exhibition that examines the impact of the road on American life and culture.

Start by learning about America’s fascination with traveling the open road. Or discover the roots of the road, how people have traveled “roads” long before cars did. Highlights include Ontario’s Euclid Avenue, Holt Boulevard and historic Route 66. Be sure to pick up a road map and travel through the “roadscape” of Ontario and beyond. You’ll find out why Road Ways is the world’s largest exhibit.

Road Ways was developed by the museum with the assistance of humanities scholars, contracted curators and exhibit designers and local advisors. Exhibition development, installation and associated publications were made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities, expanding our understanding of the world.

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